Neue DIN

The German type icon reimagined

with compactness and elegance, extreme widths and a variable-first approach. 100% Made in Berlin by Hendrik Weber, Andreas Frohloff and Olli Meier.

81 Styles
Rag
XXCondensed Thin
Rag
XXCondensed XLight
Rag
XXCondensed Light
Rag
XXCondensed Regular
Rag
XXCondensed Medium
Rag
XXCondensed SemiBold
Rag
XXCondensed Bold
Rag
XXCondensed XBold
Rag
XXCondensed Black
Rag
XCondensed Thin
Rag
XCondensed XLight
Rag
XCondensed Light
Rag
XCondensed Regular
Rag
XCondensed Medium
Rag
XCondensed SemiBold
Rag
XCondensed Bold
Rag
XCondensed XBold
Rag
XCondensed Black
Rag
Condensed Thin
Rag
Condensed XLight
Rag
Condensed Light
Rag
Condensed Regular
Rag
Condensed Medium
Rag
Condensed SemiBold
Rag
Condensed Bold
Rag
Condensed XBold
Rag
Condensed Black
Rag
SemiCondensed Thin
Rag
SemiCondensed XLight
Rag
SemiCondensed Light
Rag
SemiCondensed Regular
Rag
SemiCondensed Medium
Rag
SemiCondensed SemiBold
Rag
SemiCondensed Bold
Rag
SemiCondensed XBold
Rag
SemiCondensed Black
Rag
Thin
Rag
XLight
Rag
Light
Rag
Regular
Rag
Medium
Rag
SemiBold
Rag
Bold
Rag
XBold
Rag
Black
Rag
SemiWide Thin
Rag
SemiWide XLight
Rag
SemiWide Light
Rag
SemiWide Regular
Rag
SemiWide Medium
Rag
SemiWide SemiBold
Rag
SemiWide Bold
Rag
SemiWide XBold
Rag
SemiWide Black
Rag
Wide Thin
Rag
Wide XLight
Rag
Wide Light
Rag
Wide Regular
Rag
Wide Medium
Rag
Wide SemiBold
Rag
Wide Bold
Rag
Wide XBold
Rag
Wide Black
Rag
XWide Thin
Rag
XWide XLight
Rag
XWide Light
Rag
XWide Regular
Rag
XWide Medium
Rag
XWide SemiBold
Rag
XWide Bold
Rag
XWide XBold
Rag
XWide Black
Rag
XXWide Thin
Rag
XXWide XLight
Rag
XXWide Light
Rag
XXWide Regular
Rag
XXWide Medium
Rag
XXWide SemiBold
Rag
XXWide Bold
Rag
XXWide XBold
Rag
XXWide Black

It’s not where you take things from, it’s where you take them to. — Jean-Luc Godard

Story

Is it possible to rethink THE German design icon? For the sake of its timelessness and longevity, we are convinced that you HAVE TO!

With a compact overall impression, extreme widths, a variable-first approach and a touch of elegance, we have combined the requirements of the digital world with modern German engineering. The DIN typeface has been thoroughly reimagined in a way that our brand new flexible incarnation breathes life into the Normschrift standard. And just like 100 years ago … It’s 100% Made in Berlin, but this time with 10% for climate protection.

DIN 1451

The abbreviation DIN is sometimes assumed to stand for Deutsche Industrie Norm. However, this meaning is outdated; today the three letters stand for the German Institute for Standardization, (Deutsches Institut für Normung) which sees itself as an independent platform.

A century ago, engineers – under the leadership of the Siemens employee Ludwig Goller – began working for what was then known as the Standardization Committee of German Industry (NADI). NADI began standardizing the lettering of technical drawings, starting in 1919 with oblique block letters and then in 1938 with upright standard lettering (DIN 16 and 17).

As well as working on these standards, the committee also published a narrow grotesque typeface which was based on one by the Royal Prussian Railway Administration from 1905. The committee started working on it in around 1924 and it became part of DIN 1451 “Normschriften – Engschrift, Mittelschrift, Breitschrift” (Standard typefaces – Narrow, Medium, Wide Typefaces). In 1936, it was published for the fields of technology and transport.

Sample sheet from Royal Prussian Railway Administration

A sample sheet from 1905, published by the Royal Prussian Railway Administration. It was intended as a template for the marking and lettering of locomotives, wagons, platforms and even entire stations, and worked as a foundation for DIN 1451. It is based on a very simple block lettering, using a coarse grid in the ratio 1:7. This drawing shows an updated version from 1908.

DIN 16 and 17

DIN 16 and 17 as shown in DIN Taschenbuch 2 ‘Zeichnungsnormen’ from August 1950, published by Deutscher Normenausschuß Berlin W 15

DIN 1451

DIN 1451 (Fette Engschrift, Mittelschrift, Breitschrift) as shown in DIN Normenheft 5 ‘Groteskschriften DIN 1451’ by Ludwig Goller from 1949, published by Deutscher Normenausschuß Berlin W 15

The core characteristics of this sans-serif, that was based on a coarse grid, were a quick and easy reproducibility and a high legibility which was also recognized internationally. These requirements resulted in a monolinear stroke width that had up until then been taboo. Apart from modernist movements such as the Bauhaus and a few block letter alphabets for sign painters, typefaces at that time were normally artfully designed, emphasizing individual expression and were subject to changing fashions.

Typical ad campaigns from the time of the standardization work with very different, mostly artistic type styles

Examples of typical ad campaigns at the time of the standardization work, the majority of typefaces used were artfully designed, emphasizing individual expression and were subject to changing fashions.

The engineers’ constructed script was intended to function independently of future trends and technical limitations. Its geometric character was ideally suited to the tasks it was intended for. For many decades, it was reserved for use on street and place signs, license plates as well as postmarks, technical drawings, documentations, traffic signs, road signs and signposts and lettering for the German Reichsbahn and Deutsche Bahn.

Although more than 50 countries have adapted the sans-serif for similar purposes, “DIN” is considered by many to be the official typeface of Germany.

Standardgraph

DIN 16, 17 and 1451 were standard for technical drawings and documentation and especially for architects, for whom the so-called Standardgraph was one of the most important tools for a long time.

Mühlenstraße, Cyclopstraße

DIN leading the way.

Manhole cover

The standard for manhole covers seems to have been created much later, if the high DIN number is to be believed.

Numbered tree

In Germany, even trees are numbered. (Engraved, rounded version)

Gehwegschäden Berlin

Every Berliner knows this warning sign all too well: Gehwegschäden (sidewalk damage). It can be found on pretty much every sidewalk.

Town sign Stadt Hettstedt

All German places welcome their visitors with DIN (Condensed version) on a bright yellow sign.

Country symbols D (Germany) and DDR (German Democratic Republic)

These country symbols are rarely seen today, but before the introduction of Euro license plates, they were mandatory when driving abroad, even for GDR citizens, who were much less likely to travel internationally.

Austrian DIN version

Although more than 50 countries have adapted the sans-serif for similar purposes (often altered, as in Austria for example), “DIN” is considered by many to be the official typeface of Germany.

Autobahn type

DIN 1451 has been revised or supplemented several times, most recently in 2018. But one adaptation stands out: In 1981, the Federal Highway Research Institute revised the “Autobahn-Schrift” for use in road traffic. The Frankfurt Master Signmaker, Adolf Gropp focused on improving legibility for wayfinding systems and display sizes. The tracking was adjusted and the recommendation for the wide width was dropped altogether. As a result it largely disappeared from the West German street scene.

In the GDR, it became more visually humanistic from 1978 onwards, as East Germany gradually switched to GIL, a modified Gill Sans. Its legibility resulted from open, easy-to-read letters and easily distinguishable numerals.

Autobahn sign A114

Wir fahr’n, fahr’n, fahr’n auf der Autobahn …

Digitization

At the beginning of the 1980s, under the direction of Günther Gerhard Lange, the Berlin type foundry, Berthold, developed a version of the standardized typeface for phototypesetting. This was before Linotype and Adobe cooperated in 1990 to produce the first digital publication of PostScript fonts, which were defined in the standard as the medium and narrow versions.

With this new availability, the graphic significance of the DIN type also gained momentum. More and more designers turned to the typeface for its straightforward, constructed and timeless aesthetic.

FF DIN

In 1995, Erik Spiekermann recognized the growing trend and demand for DIN and so he suggested that Albert-Jan Pool redraw the typeface as FF DIN for his Berlin-based label FontFont. With the help of Achaz Reuß, Albert-Jan Pool expanded it to five weights and also extended its language support. Pool succeeded in improving the legibility of continuous text without sacrificing the industrial rawness of the design. To achieve this, he drew the horizontal strokes thinner and made the curves and their transitions to straight lines smoother. Some characters were made rounder, and terminals of the letters, such as c or s, were finished with diagonal ends. Also the x-height increased with the width of the stroke. For individual expression there are alternative round dots, oldstyle figures and a single-storey a. Pool’s interpretation is still considered by many today, as the best version of DIN.

Harpa Reykjavik

One of numerous examples of FF DIN: FF DIN in use for the wayfinding system of the Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre in Reykjavík

Icon

After FF DIN was further developed with italics and condensed widths, a veritable DIN boom began at the start of the millennium. DIN became a typographic icon and still shapes the graphic design in many parts of the world today. Not only was it used for a wide variety of projects, it was also followed by an increasing number of interpretations of the basic form. With each new interpretation, the trend was refueled.

Among the most interesting interpretations are those by Parachute (PF Din, 2002, free interpretation, largest extension), Linotype (DIN Next, 2008, soft overall impression), Paratype (DIN 2014, 2014), Dharma Type (Compasse, 2014, free interpretation), Astype (Vtg Stencil DIN, 2016, stencil variant), Type-Ø-Tones (DINosaur, 2016, based on upright standard typeface DIN 17), Revolver Type (Dinamit, 2017, based on Breitschrift), Microsoft (Bahnschrift, 2017; Grandview, 2021, first variable version, Uniwidth) and Fontsmith (FS Industrie, 2018, free interpretation).

The history of the DIN typeface is a history of continual revisions, with each interpretation adding a new color to the concept.

Neue DIN Made in Berlin

We believe there are still colors missing in the DIN font spectrum. As a Berlin-based foundry, we feel its our calling to bring out these nuances in order to strengthen its vitality. And where better place to rethink and reimagine this German original than in the city of its origin. At the same time, we want to give a dynamic answer to a dynamic world. To achieve this, we started with the original construction and combined the requirements of the digital world with a modern idea of the German art of engineering.

Neue DIN typeface work in progress – Screenshot Glyphs

Variable First

Just like at the beginning of Berlin’s Standard typeface history, the technical conditions that had arisen shortly before its inception were decisive influencing factors. Yet whereas 100 years ago, the focus was on reproducibility, today the factors that influenced our own design decisions are variable fonts. When approaching our design, we placed this technology at the center of our consideration.

In order to make the best possible use of the synergies of design and technology, the designers Hendrik Weber (type director of the top agency KMS Team) and Andreas Frohloff (freelance type director) worked hand in hand with Fontwerk’s Font Engineer, Olli Meier, who also contributed ideas and took on design tasks. The variable width (especially the Condensed and Wide widths) became style-defining in many respects. As a result, the normal width appears more neutral than other DINs derived from the basic form.

Unique selling point

The most difficult question to answer was how far one could deviate from the norm. We discarded courageous yet appealing explorations that threatened to lose the concise mix of geometric construction and openness. The typeface should remain a DIN – in all its simplicity and timelessness. The key to its design is its strict geometry and letters, which hang together like a chain.

Nevertheless, the desire for an elegant touch germinated in us, Andreas Frohloff had the brilliant idea: “All vertical curves, such as the sides of the o, d or g, are round, have no straight lines and swing easily.” The curves are not eye-catching, but they give the typeface the desired touch of elegance. With these subtle organic forms and a balanced spacing, the business-like character is preserved and we are convinced that we have nevertheless created an independent and sustainable design.

Neue DIN type design details

The subtle vertical curves give Neue DIN a touch of elegance.

“All vertical curves, such as the sides of the o, d or g, are round, have no straight lines and swing easily.”

Andreas Frohloff

However, the most obvious unique selling point of Neue DIN is the stringent interplay of nine weights (Thin–Black) and nine widths (XXCondensed, XCondensed, Condensed, SemiCondensed, Normal, SemiWide, Wide, XWide, XXWide). The enormous bandwidth paired with the flexibility of the Variable Fonts technology creates a thoroughly new DIN feeling, also because the extreme widths feel unfamiliar at first. But with DIN 1451’s very own engineering approach, they are not only consistent, they are also great fun to use. Maintaining the robust industrial feel in these areas was one of the biggest challenges.

100% CSS compatibility

Olli Meier explains the decision for nine widths as follows: “Rethinking DIN also means starting from the web and responsive environments and designing it in such a way that it works smoothly in CSS”. That is why the 81 sections correspond to those specified in the CSS specification (Cascading Style Sheets: Language for designing electronic documents, e.g. on the web).

81 styles of Neue DIN type family

Neue DIN’s 81 static fonts correspond to those specified in the CSS specification.

The specification provides for a matrix in which the widths of a font lie on the x-axis and the stroke widths on the y-axis. Here, the Thin cut has a value of 100, the Regular one of 400 and the Black one of 900. The Normal width is 100 percent, the Condensed 75 and the Wide 150 percent. Condensed Thin therefore has a value of 75 on the x-axis and 100 on the y-axis. If you change the width, the line width value remains at 100. In the static world, however, one often makes an optical balance, for example, making the narrow weights lighter and the wide ones bolder. Neue DIN offers 100% CSS compatibility, just as Ludwig Goller’s engineers would probably have implemented it today.

“Rethinking DIN also means starting from the web and responsive environments and designing it in such a way that it works smoothly in CSS.”

Olli Meier

Other characteristics

More subtle design differences to its predecessors can be seen in the compact overall impression and the clear reinterpretation of the stroke course, which appears more rigorous and more standardized. Due to the technical orientation of the body shapes, we drew broad counters. We made characters like t, f, r and 1 a little wider. Alternative forms for Q, a, u, r, l, 6, 7, and 9, round dots and arrows, numerals in circles and squares complete the variable overall picture.

A special feature — recently proposed by Christoph Koeberlin — is an expansion of the Standard Latin character set, which now includes an additional 100 languages that have often been overlooked. Inspired by his initiative, Neue DIN can be used by at least 3 billion people.

Climate conscious

Christoph Koeberlin also set a precedent with a typeface that takes social responsibility through the donation of a portion of his profits to rainforest conservation projects. To “rethink” the DIN typeface also meant to embrace such an impulse and to pass it on.

Therefore, 10% of all profits of Neue DIN will be donated to not-for-profit climate protection organizations that advocate for political and technological change (initially Future Cleantech Architects from Europe and Carbon180 from North America) and help us take further necessary actions towards becoming a Climate Positive foundry.

Neue DIN

The multitude of details and long-awaited flexibility of Neue DIN add a vital new variant to the range of DIN typefaces. Thanks to the interplay of design and modern technology, our new version has evolved into a typeface that moves with the times. Neue DIN is compact, considered and exudes a discreet elegance. It sets the perfect standard for dealing with the demands of today.

Sources

OFFLINE: Norms: DIN 1451; 1949, 1987, 2018; DIN 16, 1949; DIN 17, 1949; TGL 1451, 1962; TGL 16, 1961; TGL 17, 1961; Jan Middendorp, Erik Spiekermann – Made with FontFont, FontShop International, BIS Publishers 2006; Paul McNeil – The Visual History of Type, Laurence King Publishing Ltd. 2017; Stephen Coles – The Anatomy of Type: A Graphic Guide to 100 Typefaces, Harper Design 2012; Preußische Staatsbahnverwaltung – Dienstvorschrift über Anstrich, Bezeichnung und Nummerung der Wagen, H. G. Hermann, Berlin 1906; Wolfgang Diener – Anstrich und Bezeichnung von Güter- und Dienstwagen, Das äussere Erscheinungsbild deutscher Güterwagen von 1864 bis heute, Verlag Dr. Bernhard Abend 1992; Deutscher Normenausschuß Berlin W 15 – DIN Taschenbuch 2 ‘Zeichnungsnormen’, 1950; Ludwig Goller – DIN Normenheft 5 ‘Groteskschriften DIN 1451’, Deutscher Normenausschuß Berlin W 15, 1949; Jürgen Siebert, Claudia Guminski – 100 beste Schriften, FontShop AG, Berlin 2007; Antje Dohmann – DIN mit Swing (PAGE 10.22), Ebner Media Group GmbH & Co. KG, Hamburg 2022 | ONLINE: din.de, 2022; Yves Peters – FF DIN: Eine FontFont-Erfolgsgeschichte, 2015; Albert-Jan Pool – FF DIN Round – Digitale Blockschrift, Eine Broschüre zur Geschichte runder serifenloser Schriften und zur Entstehung der FF DIN Round. 2010; Dirk Vorwerk – Zwei, die sich getroffen haben, um Charakter zu entwickeln, 2019; Typografie.info – Font-Wiki: Gill Sans von Eric Gill, 2013; Typografie.info – Font-Wiki: DIN 1451 von Ludwig Goller und andere, 2013; Wikipedia: Gill Sans, 2022; Wikipedia: DIN 1451 (Eng), 2022; Wikipedia: DIN 1451 (De), 2022; Wikipedia: Normenliste DIN 1 bis DIN 499, 2022; Wikipedia: FF DIN, 2022; Identifont, 2022; Fontsinuse.com, 2022; Luc Devroye – DIN, 2022; beuth.de, 2022; Microsoft Typography – OS/2 and Windows Metrics Table, 2022; W3Schools – CSS font-stretch Property, 2022

All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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Glyphs

Uppercase

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Lowercase

a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z

Latin Accents

Á
Ă
Ǎ
Â
Ä
À
Ā
Ą
Å
Ã
Æ
Ć
Č
Ç
Ĉ
Ċ
Ð
Ď
Đ
É
Ĕ
Ě
Ê
Ë
Ė
È
Ē
Ę
Ğ
Ǧ
Ĝ
Ģ
Ġ
Ħ
Ĥ
Í
Ĭ
Ǐ
Î
Ï
İ
Ì
Ī
Į
Ĩ
Ĵ
Ķ
Ĺ
Ľ
Ļ
Ŀ
Ł
Ń
Ň
Ņ
Ŋ
Ñ
Ó
Ŏ
Ǒ
Ô
Ö
Ò
Ő
Ō
Ø
Õ
Œ
Þ
Ŕ
Ř
Ŗ
Ś
Š
Ş
Ŝ
Ș
Ə
Ŧ
Ť
Ţ
Ț
Ú
Ŭ
Ǔ
Û
Ü
Ù
Ű
Ū
Ų
Ů
Ũ
Ŵ
Ý
Ŷ
Ÿ
Ȳ
Ź
Ž
Ż
á
ă
ǎ
â
ä
à
ā
ą
å
ã
æ
ć
č
ç
ĉ
ċ
ð
ď
đ
é
ĕ
ě
ê
ë
ė
è
ē
ę
ğ
ǧ
ĝ
ģ
ġ
ħ
ĥ
í
ĭ
ǐ
î
ï
i
̇
ì
ī
į
ĩ
ĵ
ķ
ĺ
ľ
ļ
ŀ
ł
ń
ň
ņ
ŋ
ñ
ó
ŏ
ǒ
ô
ö
ò
ő
ō
ø
õ
œ
þ
ŕ
ř
ŗ
ś
š
ş
ŝ
ș
ß
ə
ŧ
ť
ţ
ț
ú
ŭ
ǔ
û
ü
ù
ű
ū
ų
ů
ũ
ŵ
ý
ŷ
ÿ
ȳ
ź
ž
ż

Numerals & Currency Symbols

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
¤
$
¢
£
¥
ƒ
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Punctuation

.
,
:
;
!
¡
?
¿
&
@
·
*
#
/
|
\
(
)
{
}
[
]
-
­
_
«
»
"
'

Mathematical Signs & Symbols

+
×
÷
=
>
<
±
~
¬
^
µ
%

Arrows & Shapes

Ligatures

<-
|^
->
|v
<->
^|v
v|^
<\
/>
|_>
<_|

Greek

π
·

Languages

Abron
Acheron
Achinese
Achuar-Shiwiar
Adamawa Fulfulde
Adangme
Afar
Afrikaans
Aguaruna
Albanian
Amahuaca
Amarakaeri
Amis
Andaandi
Anuta
Ao Naga
Apinayé
Arabela
Aragonese
Arbëreshë Albanian
Arvanitika Albanian
Asháninka
Ashéninka Perené
Asu (Tanzania)
Atayal
Awa-Cuaiquer
Baatonum
Bafia
Balinese
Balkan Romani
Bambara
Baoulé
Bari
Basque
Batak Dairi
Batak Karo
Batak Mandailing
Batak Simalungun
Batak Toba
Bemba (Zambia)
Bena (Tanzania)
Biali
Bikol
Bini
Bislama
Boko (Benin)
Bora
Borana-Arsi-Guji Oromo
Borgu Fulfulde
Bosnian
Breton
Bushi
Candoshi-Shapra
Caquinte
Caribbean Hindustani
Cashibo-Cacataibo
Cashinahua
Catalan
Cebuano
Central Aymara
Central Kurdish
Central Nahuatl
Central-Eastern Niger Fulfulde
Chachi
Chamorro
Chavacano
Chayahuita
Chiga
Chiltepec Chinantec
Chokwe
Chuukese
Cimbrian
Cofán
Congo Swahili
Cook Islands Māori
Cornish
Corsican
Creek
Crimean Tatar
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dehu
Dendi (Benin)
Dimli
Dongolawi
Duala
Dutch
Dyula
Eastern Abnaki
Eastern Arrernte
Eastern Maninkakan
Eastern Oromo
Embu
English
Ese Ejja
Esperanto
Estonian
Fanti
Faroese
Fijian
Filipino
Finnish
French
Friulian
Ga
Gagauz
Galician
Ganda
Garifuna
Ga’anda
German
Gheg Albanian
Gilbertese
Gonja
Gooniyandi
Guadeloupean Creole French
Gusii
Haitian
Hani
Hausa
Hawaiian
Ho-Chunk
Hopi
Huastec
Hungarian
Hän
Ibibio
Icelandic
Igbo
Iloko
Inari Sami
Indonesian
Irish
Istro Romanian
Italian
Ixcatlán Mazatec
Jamaican Creole English
Japanese
Javanese
Jola-Fonyi
Kabuverdianu
Kaingang
Kala Lagaw Ya
Kalaallisut
Kalenjin
Kamba
Kamba (Kenya)
Kaonde
Kaqchikel
Karelian
Kashubian
Kekchí
Kenzi
Khasi
Kikuyu
Kimbundu
Kinyarwanda
Kirmanjki
Kituba (DRC)
Kongo
Konzo
Koyra Chiini Songhay
Koyraboro Senni Songhai
Krio
Kuanyama
Kven Finnish
Kwasio
Kölsch
K’iche’
Ladin
Ladino
Latgalian
Latin
Latvian
Ligurian
Lingala
Lithuanian
Lombard
Low German
Lower Sorbian
Lozi
Luba-Katanga
Luba-Lulua
Lule Sami
Luo (Kenya and Tanzania)
Luxembourgish
Luyia
Maasina Fulfulde
Macedo-Romanian
Machame
Makhuwa
Makhuwa-Meetto
Makonde
Makwe
Malagasy
Malaysian
Maltese
Mam
Manx
Maore Comorian
Maori
Mapudungun
Marshallese
Matsés
Mattokki
Mauritian Creole
Mende (Sierra Leone)
Meriam Mir
Meru
Meta’
Metlatónoc Mixtec
Minangkabau
Mirandese
Mi’kmaq
Mohawk
Montagnais
Montenegrin
Morisyen
Munsee
Murrinh-Patha
Murui Huitoto
Muslim Tat
Mwani
Mískito
Naga Pidgin
Ndonga
Neapolitan
Ngazidja Comorian
Nigerian Fulfulde
Niuean
Nobiin
Nomatsiguenga
North Azerbaijani
North Marquesan
North Ndebele
Northern Kissi
Northern Kurdish
Northern Qiandong Miao
Northern Sami
Northern Uzbek
Norwegian
Norwegian Bokmål
Norwegian Nynorsk
Nyamwezi
Nyanja
Nyankole
Nyemba
Nzima
Occitan
Ojitlán Chinantec
Orma
Oromo
Oroqen
Otuho
Palauan
Paluan
Pampanga
Papantla Totonac
Papiamento
Paraguayan Guaraní
Pedi
Picard
Pichis Ashéninka
Piemontese
Pijin
Pintupi-Luritja
Pipil
Pohnpeian
Polish
Portuguese
Potawatomi
Pulaar
Purepecha
Páez
Quechua
Romanian
Romansh
Rombo
Rotokas
Rundi
Rwa
Samburu
Samoan
Sango
Sangu (Tanzania)
Saramaccan
Sardinian
Scottish Gaelic
Sena
Serbian
Seri
Seselwa Creole French
Shambala
Sharanahua
Shawnee
Shilluk
Shipibo-Conibo
Shona
Shuar
Sicilian
Silesian
Slovak
Slovenian
Soga
Somali
Soninke
South Azerbaijani
South Marquesan
South Ndebele
Southern Aymara
Southern Dagaare
Southern Sami
Southern Sotho
Spanish
Sranan Tongo
Standard Estonian
Standard Latvian
Standard Malay
Sundanese
Susu
Swahili
Swati
Swedish
Swiss German
Tagalog
Tahitian
Taita
Talysh
Tasawaq
Tedim Chin
Teso
Tetum
Tetun Dili
Timne
Tiv
Toba
Tok Pisin
Tokelau
Tonga (Tonga Islands)
Tonga (Zambia)
Tosk Albanian
Tsakhur
Tsonga
Tswana
Tumbuka
Turkish
Turkmen
Tuvalu
Twi
Tzeltal
Tzotzil
Uab Meto
Umbundu
Upper Guinea Crioulo
Upper Sorbian
Uzbek
Venetian
Veps
Vlax Romani
Volapük
Vunjo
Võro
Waama
Wallisian
Walloon
Walser
Wangaaybuwan-Ngiyambaa
Waorani
Waray (Philippines)
Warlpiri
Wasa
Wayuu
Welsh
West Central Oromo
West-Central Limba
Western Abnaki
Western Frisian
Wik-Mungkan
Wiradjuri
Wolof
Xavánte
Xhosa
Yagua
Yanesha’
Yangben
Yanomamö
Yao
Yapese
Yindjibarndi
Yoruba
Yucateco
Zapotec
Zarma
Zulu
Zuni
Záparo
Credits & Details
Design Contributions
  • Anja Meiners
Mastering, Production

Olli Meier

Marketing

Ivo Gabrowitsch (Concept, Naming, Copywriting, Specimen, Photos)
Olli Meier (Artwork, Microsite)
Julian Braun (3D Motion Design, 3D Artwork)
Giovanni Dubini (Sound Design)
Dr. Thomas Maier (Archive)
Dorothee Lange (Legal Consulting)
Jan Kuhlen (Legal Consulting)
Lucy Beckley (English Translation)

Design Period
2020–2022
Release Date
January 10, 2023
Recommended Use

Advertising & Packaging
Editorial & Publishing
Film & TV
Logo, Branding & CI
Poster & Billboards
Software & Gaming
Sports
Wayfinding & Signage